Wound Care - Rabbit

Rabbit Wound Care  

Find rabbit wound sprays to keep your rabbit in rip-roaring shape.

 

Rabbit Wounds 

Far from being doe-eyed and innocent, we bunny-lovers are well aware of the ‘secret life of bunnies’ - one in which they are madly territorial, love a little scrap, and frequently fling themselves around the living room at 100mph. Therefore we stock a great range of rabbit antiseptic solutions from reliable brands in our online shop, so you can be sure bunny-monster will heal safely and well. Order now for easy purchasing including free shipping for orders over £39, weekday delivery within 2-5days, and a 30-day return policy if you are not 100% satisfied.

 

How do wounds happen 

Bunnies live a high-octane life of digging, scratching, binkying, leaping, flopping, and racing around until bedtime - and quite a lot of the time, after bedtime! Supporting their healing process is an important part of bunny-parenting and helps prevent infections. It is extremely important that your rabbit’s wound preparations are specifically designed and manufactured for rabbits as human or other pet products can be harmful.

 

What is a minor wound? 

shallow cut or scrape on/close to the surface of the skin 

oozes blood, does not pour or spurt 

not on the face or ears 

stops bleeding with mild or moderate pressure for 10 mins 

Small and shallow - 5p diameter or less

What to do 

1. If hot, swollen, or too painful to examine, consult your vet straight away 

2. Stop any bleeding with firm pressure on the area for 10 minutes 

3. If pulsing, welling, or pooling blood then contact your vet immediately 

4. If the bleeding has stopped with pressure then rinse the wound with cooled boiled water, saline solution or F10 Germicidal wound spray. 

5. Clean the wound with wound spray, keep it clean and dry 

6. Check it at least twice daily for heat, swelling, pain, discharge, fly eggs, and maggots 7. ideally keep your rabbit indoors if they have a healing wound, to avoid flystrike 

Prey animals hide their pain so if your rabbit seems off-colour, reluctant to eat, lethargic, or avoids moving or grooming then you should contact your veterinarian or book an appointment here for advice.

 

Common minor wounds 

 

Nicks: 

rabbits can catch their skin on hutch wire or be bitten by pals. It is important to check for sharp areas of the hutch or run regularly.

 

Hair plucks: 

If you notice regular wounds, bites, or tufts of hair with skin attached, check in on your rabbits' relationship. if they are fighting frequently or one is being dominated you will need advice on how to manage this. Rye injuries should be assessed by your vet immediately as they can progress quickly.

 

Ears: 

Rabbits’ ears are delicate and have a lot of blood vessels so ear injuries usually need veterinary attention.

 

Claws: 

It’s easy to over-clip a claw on a wriggle-bunny when performing your regular home bunny pedicure. Claws can also get cracked, and pulled during events such as ‘the nightly mad twilight hour’. If you notice a claw bleeding, follow the steps above. Fractured and missing claws can be painful and get infected so contact your veterinarian to assess and treat as needed. Use wound spray or antiseptic on the area while awaiting advice. If your rabbit has dark claws it may be best to get expert help clipping their claws.

 

Flystrike: 

Flies lay eggs in moist, wet, and warm areas - this includes wounds and fur that has urine, poo, or diarrhoea on it. These hatch into flesh-eating maggots which cause devastating injuries. If a rabbit is unwell or overweight they are at higher risk as they are less able to groom effectively. Rabbits with active flystrike may go into shock from their injuries and die from the resulting effects. Fly strike can be prevented with regular skin care checks>rabbit skin care link< alongside a rabbit antiseptic solution such as F10 Germicidal barrier ointment. This has antiseptic and insecticide so is perfect to apply to rabbit wounds or sore bottoms to help prevent flystrike. If you see fly eggs or maggots seek immediate veterinary advice.