Toothbrushes and Toothpaste - Cat

Cat teeth care 

The key to keeping clean cat chompers is to choose the right products! The good news is that our online shop has the best tooth care products from reliable brands, so you can be assured that your kitty’s gnashers are well cared for.

 

Long live the cat’s teeth 

Adult cats sport a full set of 30 permanent teeth that have to last a lifetime - this could be another 16-20 years. So, if you start cat dental care at 6 months old your investment could be paying off for another two decades! 

It is extremely important that your cat’s dental care products are specifically designed and manufactured for cats as human or other pet products can be harmful. Consult your veterinarian for advice before starting any products.

 

Keeping my cat’s teeth healthy 

If you are unsure what is happening in your cat’s mouth, book a dental check with your veterinary team just as you would for yourself. Dental care is so important that some insurance companies require a yearly check-up to keep to your insurance terms. If your cat has a recurrent dental issue then specialised diets may help but it is important to identify the cause because early intervention can significantly improve the outcome.

 

Dental issues - when to see your veterinarian 

The main signs of a developing a dental issue are:
 

Halitosis 

drooling 

Pain - chewing on one side, dropping food, eating slowly, eating less, reluctance to groom Bleeding from the gums 

Visible tartar or discolouration

Gum disease and viral diseases: 

Gum disease can be caused by bacteria building up on the teeth. Diseased gums are irritated and sore so they lose their grip on the teeth, which become wobbly, diseased, and fall out. If you have a young cat with severe halitosis or drooling this could be a sign of viral gum disease which may need additional tests or treatment.

 

Plaque and Tartar:  

Plaque is a film that builds up after every meal but is removed by regular brushing. Cat toothpaste fights it with a triple whammy - chemical and enzymatic ingredients break plaque down while the brush physically removes it. Untreated plaque builds up into thick, crusty, yellow tartar which needs specialised equipment to remove, usually under general anaesthetic.

 

Preventative care: 

Top tip: preventive measures and early action can save your cat's teeth and gums AND save you money on dental procedures. It is quite common for older cats to need multiple extractions under more than one general anaesthetic.

 

Preventative healthcare involves:

 

Daily cleaning with toothpaste + brush 

Use of mouthwash or quality dental supplements 

Appropriate diet 

Annual or 6 monthly dental checkups 

Early scale and polish alongside a thorough veterinary examination.

 

Choosing cat teeth care products 

Cat toothpaste 

Good cat toothpaste is very different from human toothpaste. It’s a delicious chicken or meat flavour because mint-loving cats are few and far between! It won’t terrify Puss by foaming up in their mouth and contains enzymes to work between cleans and help break down plaque with less brushing. Trial a small tube of their favourite flavour to start with.

 

Cat Toothbrush 

A good cat toothbrush is small and slim to fit into your cat's mouth and is easy to hold. If a toothbrush is something that your kitty refuses, alternatives that will provide good mechanical removal of plaque are a finger brush, a microfibre cloth, or a finger mitt.

 

Cat Mouthwash

If you have a wriggly kitty then all the talk of toothpaste and toothbrushes might be making you feel a little anxious! Don’t fear as there is an alternative. Mouthwashes can be added to the drinking water or applied directly to the teeth without brushing. In addition, supplements such as Plaque off can be added to food if getting a toothbrush near your cat’s mouth is a far-off dream.